Blogs

Want to Make a Difference, While Making a Living?

 “Work is love made visible.”

~ Kahlil Gibran

Work is one of the foundations of being human. Through work we express our creative, productive energy, we create value for ourselves, our families and communities, and we connect with ourselves and others.

As we mature as a species and as individuals, and recognize the deep interdependent nature of life, many of us are deeply motivated to work in service to life and to make a difference while we are making a living. We want our work to be infused with meaning and to foster health and well-being for ourselves and others, including the natural ecosystems that support all life.

The emerging Conscious Capitalism® movement provides a powerful integration of making a difference, while making a living for individuals, companies and, ultimately, our entire economy. In the Conscious Capitalism framework a Conscious Business embraces its higher purpose and focuses on creating value for all of its stakeholders, not just shareholders.

Within a Conscious Business, Conscious Leaders work in service to the company’s higher purpose and focus on creating value for the stakeholders, and on cultivating a Conscious Culture, where people are supported to bring their whole selves to work, and to continually learn, grow and develop in all dimensions of their lives.

If you aspire to make a difference, while making a living, know that you can! Explore companies in the Conscious Capitalism community or build your own Conscious Business.

Deepen your understanding and practice of Conscious Capitalism at CC 2014: Building Fully Human Organizations, April 9 – 11 in San Diego.

 

News on Conscious Capitalism 2014

We're delighted that Walter Robbm co-CEO of Whole Foods Market, and Ann Rhoades, founder of People Ink and former Chief People Officer at Southwest Airlines nad jetBlue Airways, will be keynoting at CC 2014. Read more here.

Just Chill or Brace Yourself or Go For It!

The last time I wrote one of my monthly Reflections newsletters was two months ago. While I certainly could have "banged one out" and nearly did several times, I stopped short of doing so.
 
Each time I asked myself "how critical is it that I do this?" Some of my responses to myself were:
 
I reflect all the time, so forcing myself to reflect is not necessary.
 
If I had hordes of followers who expected my monthly Reflections and would feel betrayed or disappointed if they didn't receive it, perhaps I would have felt compelled to send one out of a sense of commitment or responsibility to them.
 
Since I don't have hordes of readers, forcing myself to send Reflections as a way of attracting new readers would probably have been silly or even delusional, and would have forced me to focus my attention, time and energy, rather than letting it flow.
 
If I had something that I felt was or could be of value to others that warranted passing on, I would have taken the time to send it, as was the case with my Reflection on Heads Up! in May. I sensed it could be useful to others, as it reflected significant learning for me. Yesterday my new brother-in-law pulled me aside to tell me how helpful it had been to him and that he continues to reflect on it, nearly two months later.
 
Just Chill
 
The message in all of this, I take to indicate is that of "Just Chill" - don't force something if it isn't calling to be expressed or address. be patient and wait for something to emerge. 
 
As is usually the case, I find this message to be showing up in various domains in my life including, (no surprise!), in my surfing, where I am learning to paddle less and to focus more on the waves in the distance, in the patterns over time, in the position of the other surfers, on my form and timing. Miraculously, with less effort I am catching more waves and getting better rides. It is no mistake that Max Baumann, a competitive surfer, created a relaxation beverage called Just Chill!
 
Brace Yourself
 
As I continued to reflect on this, I noted a couple other possible responses.
 
If our response to circumstances, or to the ever-moving flow of waves coming towards us is to Brace Ourselves - anxiously anticipating the next wave, the next crisis, the next thing that will call for our attention, we're pretty much screwed.

Of course there are times when bracing yourself is called for (like riding on a sail boat that tips strongly in one direction, and if you don't hold on and brace yourself, you will end up in the brink, with the boat sailing away), most of the time, there are more effective and less energy-intensive responses.

In Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, the most assured way to injure yourself is to tighten up when presented with a challenge from a training partner of opponent. In parenting, the best way to insure escalating tension is to contract when challenged by your child. And in business, the way to limit the palette of possibilities and undermine trust is to hold on tight to a perspective or position.

I recall a recent wave where a backwash wave bumped me off balance and I noticed that the top of my left foot was facing down on the board. Had I tightened up and continued to try to stand up, I would have most likely sprained my ankle. Instead, I relaxed and allowed myself to come back down on my board, and ride the wave lying down.

In general, the more contracted we are, the less flexibility and fluidity we have in our responses to circumstances. The more expanded into Just Chill awareness, the more possibilities available for our response.

Go For It!

Coming full circle, when things do line up and call to be addressed, go for it, with the appropriate energy, which sometimes can be intense. When you are in the right place at the right time, and a big wave is upon you, don't dawdle, paddle hard and fast and go for it. It usually only takes a couple stokes to catch the wave.

When the mood or spirit or energy move you to write, to take action, go for it. The moment might pass, and something else may come along afterwards that calls for your attention. Go for it now, or forever hold your peace. And if you don't go for it or you go for it and don't catch it, don't worry, Just Chill!

The Power of Purpose

 “People must be motivated by a deeper cause. I believe that people don’t come to work to earn money for themselves and the company. They come to work because the product does something worthwhile, and this is what inspires people.”        ~ Bill George

 
One of the things that sets human beings apart from other animals is our capacity and need for meaning and purpose in our lives.

Purpose is an activating, motivating and animating force. It moves us to get up in the morning, sustains us when times get tough and serves as a guiding star when we stray off course.

Purposeful people build purposeful companies. And purposeful people make an impact through whatever their work or role may be.

While making money is among the purposes of a business, every business has a purpose beyond making money. When a business is deeply rooted in its deeper purpose, its stakeholders – founders and leaders, employees, customers and others – feel a deep, meaningful connection to the business, which contributes to sustainable and resilient relationships.

Purpose inspires and connects, like an energetic or electric glue.

“We need red blood cells to live (the same way a business needs profits to live), but the purpose of life is more than to make red blood cells (the same way the purpose of business is more than simply to generate profits).”

~ Ed Freeman

It's Just Good Business: This post is taken from It's Just Good Business: The Emergence of Conscious Capitalism & the Practice of Working for Good, a short introduction to Conscious Capitalism® designed to be read in less than 30 minutes. For more information visit workingforgood.com/learn

About Jeff Klein: As CEO of Working for Good, Jeff Klein activates, produces and facilitates mission-based, Stakeholder Engagement Marketing™ campaigns and Conscious Culture development programs. Jeff serves as Director of Marketing & Business Development for Conscious Capitalism. and producer of Conscious Capitalism events. He authored the award-winning book, Working for Good: Making a Difference While Making a Living and the newly released book, It's Just Good Business. He also serves as Executive Director of BeingHuman.org and producer of Being Human events. 

 

 

 

The Core Principles of Conscious Capitalism

“Conscious businesses will help evolve our culture and social systems so that billions of people can flourish, leading lives infused with passion, purpose, love and creativity; a world of freedom, harmony, prosperity and compassion.” ~ from the Conscious Capitalism Credo

The purpose of Conscious Capitalism is to elevate humanity. Conscious Capitalism comes to life as it is applied to business. In this context, four core principles guide and underlie a Conscious Business.

 

 


Higher Purpose: Recognizing that every business has a purpose that includes, but is more than, making money. By focusing on its Higher Purpose, a business inspires, engages and energizes its stakeholders.

Stakeholder Orientation: Recognizing that the interdependent nature of life and the human foundations of business, a business needs to create value with and for its various stakeholders (customers, employees, vendors, investors, communities, etc.). Like the life forms in an ecosystem, healthy stakeholders lead to a healthy business system.

Conscious Leadership: Human social organizations are created and guided by leaders – people who see a path and inspire others to travel along the path. Conscious Leaders understand and embrace the Higher Purpose of business and focus on creating value for and harmonizing the interests of the business stakeholders. They recognize the integral role of culture and purposefully cultivate Conscious Culture.

Conscious Culture: This is the ethos – the values, principles, practices – underlying the social fabric of a business, which permeates the atmosphere of a business and connects the stakeholders to each other and to the purpose, people and processes that comprise the company.

 

It's Just Good Business: This post is taken from It's Just Good Business: The Emergence of Conscious Capitalism & the Practice of Working for Good, a short introduction to Conscious Capitalism® designed to be read in less than 30 minutes. For more information visit workingforgood.com/learn

 

About Jeff Klein: As CEO of Working for Good, Jeff Klein activates, produces and facilitates mission-based, Stakeholder Engagement Marketing™ campaigns and Conscious Culture development programs. Jeff serves as Director of Marketing & Business Development for Conscious Capitalism. and producer of Conscious Capitalism events. He authored the award-winning book, Working for Good: Making a Difference While Making a Living and the newly released book, It's Just Good Business. He also serves as Executive Director of BeingHuman.org and producer of Being Human events.  

About Conscious Capitalism

 

“The shift in management paradigm (represented by Conscious Capitalism) is as transformational as the shift from the medieval view that the sun revolves around the earth to the view that earth and the other planets revolve around the sun. It is a fundamental transition in world-view. Once you make this shift, everything is different.”  ~ Steve Denning, Forbes.com

 

Underlying Conscious Capitalism is an embodied recognition of interconnectedness and interdependence of all life, and a belief that we are capable of creating businesses and economies that elevate humanity, in which everyone can flourish. 

About Conscious Capitalism

Conscious Capitalism is an idea, a movement, an approach to conducting business and a nonprofit organization, dedicated to advancing all of these, through transformative thinking, programs, events, and communities of inquiry.

Conscious Capitalism is an adaptive improvement on Capitalism, which, itself, is an inherently effective system for facilitating global-scale cooperation, innovation and wealth creation. It is an upgraded Operating System for business that reflects a recognition of interdependence and the essential role of natural systems to human survival and well-being. It represents a shift in orientation from “I, me, mine” to “I and we, me and us, mine and all of ours.”

Conscious Capitalism has its roots in the earliest corporations, established hundreds of years ago, with limited charters focused on providing a specific service to the community, such as building a bridge, or some other large public work. The tradition of business in service to community is embodied in the foundational documents and histories of late nineteenth century companies like Johnson & Johnson and Avon, which were explicitly created to address social needs and to serve people. Dozens of companies started in the late nineteen sixties through the nineteen seventies, emerging out of the social movements of the sixties, carry on this tradition and pioneered the philosophy of Conscious Capitalism.

With the expanding propogation of the ideas underlying Conscious Capitalism - in good part through the January 2013 release of the book, Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business by John Mackey and Raj Sisodia, and the visible success of countless companies whose leaders embrace Conscious Capitalism, it is truly becoming an emerging paradigm and global movement. Learn more at consciouscapitalism.org


It's Just Good Business: This post is taken from It's Just Good Business: The Emergence of Conscious Capitalism & the Practice of Working for Good, a short introduction to Conscious Capitalism® designed to be read in less than 30 minutes. For more information visit workingforgood.com/learn

About Jeff Klein: As CEO of Working for Good, Jeff Klein activates, produces and facilitates mission-based, Stakeholder Engagement Marketing™ campaigns and Conscious Culture development programs. Jeff serves as Director of Marketing & Business Development for Conscious Capitalism. and producer of Conscious Capitalism events. He authored the award-winning book, Working for Good: Making a Difference While Making a Living and the newly released book, It's Just Good Business. He also serves as Executive Director of BeingHuman.org and producer of Being Human events. 

Definition: Ecosystem


When you tug at a single thing in nature, you find it attached to the rest of the world.”

~ John Muir

Business and economy are expressions of this law of nature.

Definition: Ecosystem

Eco (oikos) is the Greek word for word for home, house, habitat and the root for both ecology (study or knowledge of the home) and economy (management of the home).

The ecosystem is how the home works: all of the components interconnecting to form a coherent network of physical elements and living organisms that is greater than the sum of its parts and reliably self-sustaining. Ecosystems usually have discreet physical boundaries and are themselves components of larger and larger ecosystems.

Individual human beings can be understood as natural biological ecosystems. We are composed of trillions of interconnected cells, organs and functional systems. And there are somewhere between 500 and 1000 species of bacteria living in our guts and on our skin, and more than ten times as many bacteria cells in and on our bodies than there are “human” cells.

A business can also be constructively understood as an ecosystem, comprised of and dependent on all of the interconnected elements necessary to its endeavor, including biological organisms, social networks, technological systems, materials, products and the ecosystems it inhabits that affect and are affected by it.

 

It's Just Good Business: This post is taken from It's Just Good Business: The Emergence of Conscious Capitalism & the Practice of Working for Good, a short introduction to Conscious Capitalism® designed to be read in less than 30 minutes. For more information visit workingforgood.com/learn

About Jeff Klein: As CEO of Working for Good, Jeff Klein activates, produces and facilitates mission-based, Stakeholder Engagement Marketing™ campaigns and Conscious Culture development programs. Jeff serves as Director of Marketing & Business Development for Conscious Capitalism. and producer of Conscious Capitalism events. He authored the award-winning book, Working for Good: Making a Difference While Making a Living and the newly released book, It's Just Good Business. He also serves as Executive Director of BeingHuman.org and producer of Being Human events. 

Definition: Business

Business is a creative and therefore spiritual endeavor.
Great entrepreneurs enter the field of business in
the same way great artists enter the field of art.

With their business creation, entrepreneurs express
their desire for self-realization, evolutionary passion
for self-fulfillment, and creative vision of a new world.

The entrepreneur’s business is their artwork.
The creation of business is as creative as any creation
in art. In fact, building a business may be the
most creative human activity.

~ Yasuhiko Kimura

Business is a key focus on my work – in the context of Conscious Capitalism and Working for Good. To a considerable extent, capitalism is a system level expression of the aggregate activity of businesses, defined in part by the rules of the game set by government and deeply influenced by the rules and practices of the financial sector. But business is the basic form of human activity underlying our social-economic system. With this in mind, here is my definition of business.

Business is a form of human social organization: people getting together for a purpose; to do something together and to deliver value to themselves and others. It is an outlet for creative expression, a structure and process for turning ideas into products and services and a vehicle for creating wealth – financial, material, intellectual, technological, social, even spiritual – for individuals and society.

In the simplest sense, “good business” = making money by delivering products and services that people want, creating value for others through life-enhancing products and processes.

Business is a human endeavor and can be a path for individual and collective learning, growth and development.

By cultivating Conscious Awareness and other essential skills at work, we can create more human, resilient and life-enhancing businesses.

 

It's Just Good Business: This post is taken from It's Just Good Business: The Emergence of Conscious Capitalism & the Practice of Working for Good, a short introduction to Conscious Capitalism® designed to be read in less than 30 minutes. For more information visit workingforgood.com/learn

About Jeff Klein: As CEO of Working for Good, Jeff Klein activates, produces and facilitates mission-based, Stakeholder Engagement Marketing™ campaigns and Conscious Culture development programs.

Jeff serves as Director of Marketing & Business Development for Conscious Capitalism. and producer of Conscious Capitalism events. He authored the award-winning book, Working for Good: Making a Difference While Making a Living and the newly released book, It's Just Good Business. He also serves as Executive Director of BeingHuman.org and producer of Being Human events. 

He loves surfing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, ChiRunning and moving in general, and is an actively engaged father of a teenage daughter.

Pages